Majestic Mountains of the Cape

Photograph of Cape mountains

Photo of majestic mountains near Worcester in the Cape.

Majestic mountains of the Cape:

These majestic mountains in the photograph, with their heads high in the clouds were seen on our way back from our stay in the small town of McGrgor in the Cape.  I think this range of mountains are somewhere in the Worcester area.

First attraction is the height and seeming power these mountains have. As to the contrast of colour and tone, the subtle patchwork patterns of the cloud shadows over their foothills and surrounding valleys is so beautiful, it makes it a `must to paint’

Timing is crucial when getting photographs from a moving vehicle.

Waiting for just the right time to click the camera, I still captured part of the framework of the car window!  And if you zoom in carefully you will see someone walking into the center trees. The house you see in my painting, surrounded by trees in my painting though, is my addition!

The composition of the majestic mountains scene:

Even with the hazard of taking photographs from a moving car, I was lucky this time to get a fairly good composition format. The trees in the center work as a fulcrum and the two smaller bare trees in the foreground help to lead the eye into the picture. And see how the contour lines of the mountains draw towards the tree fulcrum? You could almost say as well the sky and mountain (blue/grey) area cover two thirds of the compositions and the foreground one third “horizon” space (fresh warm colour) at the bottom of the composition.

Oil painting of mountains near Worcester in the Cape, South Africa

Oil painting of the majestic mountains

I painted the mountains different tones of blue. And then because I didn’t want the grandeur and shadows of the majestic mountains to look patchy, I filled in and blended the colours by interlacing and `scumbling’ the colours.

To get just the right effect I allowed each layer of paint to dry before applying another `scumbled’ coat of paint. This took about two sittings. This technique allows each coat to radiate through, creating a shimmering effect.  It works somewhat like impressionistic interrelationships of more than one colour, shimmering together so as to be seen at last as a `third’ dimension of colour.

Judgement:

Once I allowed my husband to go out canvassing new galleries for me while I was preparing a new stock of paintings. I smiled when he came back to tell me one gallery owner thought my technique of scumbling was a sign of indecision. His remark showed me that the gallery owner didn’t know all that much about painting! If you try to apply one coat, with one contrived colour direct from your palette you can’t achieve convincing blends of different hues.

Technique and style:

I love painting atmospheric conditions. I will do anything it takes to create special effects. That is an artists’ prerogative, to use his or her artistic licence. With the interlacing of techniques, each artist creates his own recognizable style. Just as Vincent van Gogh’s work was considered amateur in his day, his particular technique of applying his paint is now admired and considered masterful!

What do think? Have artists the right to create new ways of doing things? Or should we stagnate in old expectations?

Now you have seen how I painted these majestic mountains, perhaps you would like to see more paintings? Please feel free to check out ‘Photo demos’ page and category.

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