Crazy Artists? No, Not Us!

WHY DO PEOPLE THINK ARTISTS ARE CRAZY?

Crazy? Weird?

  • Is it because some artist years ago behaved in a crazy manner? Perhaps from what Vincent van Gogh did?
  • Is it because some artists started painting crazy wild paintings? Like since Paul Gauguin’s time?
  • Is it the way some arty people dressed in hippy fashion a few years ago? Why did artist dress weirdly? Mainly because people only accepted you as a real artist if you dressed weirdly!
  • Is it because artists have liberated views and do their own thing? Knowing they have inner conference, they don’t really care what people may think of them!
Crazy bright colours

A5 watercolour: How green is our valley.

So, how do artists feel about been called crazy?

Crazy, weird! No ways. Not us! Don’t laugh….

It’s the `muggles’ that are crazy. They don’t use the magic that is in them! They let the real world pass them by. They don’t see the beauty that’s all around them.

They don’t take time out to observe the contrast of colours and tones, the atmospheric dimensions or rim-lights, or feel the energy in the most simplistic forms. Their lives must be bland. They have never truly lived!

Do they call authors crazy?

Of cause not! But, authors also need to use their imagination to conjure up plot concepts, just like artists have to conjure up new composition concepts.

When authors have a few facts, they still have to work out the in between stuff to get the story flowing. Same with artists, we have to bridge the basics to dramatically get peoples’ attention and imagination flowing.

Do they call musicians crazy?

Well I must admit, some of the music we hear these days could be called crazy, perhaps weird. It’s certainly upbeat and loud! So it’s not surprising art has become bright and `loud’ too.

But seriously now, the classic type of music is well thought out. Melodies must have rhythm. So must artwork to reach the hearts of those who look upon it.

Getting the composition together takes lots of work and the use of the inner soul to feel that they have reached the point where they know, this or that song is just right, perfect enough to put out there for public consumption.

So it is with artists:

We have to use our imagination and feelings to touch the senses and emotions of the public too. So, is using our feelings crazy? No, when you consider how people only buy art when their emotions are stimulated.

So what if we dress more interestingly than the average person out there! How we dress and behave is because it gets us in the mood of creativity. And of cause it’s groovy and fun to dress up.

And be grateful for our individuality. Why should we walk around being just copies, reproductions of all those dull un-interesting bland `muggle’ people out there?

COME ON, I WANT TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS TOO!

So feel free to add what you would like to say in the comments block below. Us artists must stand up for ourselves!

Other links on artistic creativity:

How to Capture & Draw Shapes

Note from the page: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS:

Where Ada Fagan invited those who had any questions about art and painting, that they could leave their questions in the comments block below or if they required privacy they could email her at: info@adafagan.co.za

Draw things

A5 watercolour: Autumn time.

Today’s Question deals with: HOW TO DRAW SHAPES

How do you start drawing-in the shapes of things, when composing paintings? I can’t get my objects to look right. My attempts are pathetic. For example nothing looks natural. My trees look stiff like Egyptian fans and my cars look squashed with high roofs!

You’re not the first to have this problem.

Many art students start out like that, until they see things as simple basic shapes.

When you start out composing a composition you don’t copy every detail you see. You may see the big picture, but to capture and place things on your canvas, you first have to look and select the bare facts.

Ask yourself the question:

  • What stands out?
  • What’s important to you?
  • What are the most exciting objects?

Instead of seeing objects as intricate complex things, rather look at things as simple shapes and with basic skeleton structure. General outlines speak volumes! So don’t worry about the fine details at this stage.

What type of shapes should you be looking out for?

Round, oval and ovoid, cube, square and rectangle, cone and dome shaped, pyramid and triangle, tube and cylinder, half-moon shapes, etc.

For example:

  • Bubbles and apples are generally round. Teapots and jugs have round bellies.
  • Houses and buildings generally have block shapes with square or rectangle shapes.
  • People seen in the distance, don’t have to show everything, not even feet. As long as there is a dot for a head and a suggested triangle for a woman’s skirt.
  • The structure of humans (close-up) is made up of ovals, triangles and wedges for feet.
  • Glasses and cups have ellipse ovals. Just because a glass stands on a flat table doesn’t mean you draw the base straight across, it has a curved bottom contour.
  • The outline of trees can be fan or top-shaped (like the shape of a child’s toy top) or ball-shaped. Fir trees have cone and triangle shapes.
  • The wheels of cars, trucks and bicycles are round, and the inner frame of the bicycle is a triangle.
  • The shape of leaves is club, spade and heart shaped.

Note: Basic forms create reasoning. When people see basic shapes in a painting, it makes it easier to ‘read’ your painting.

Lines also give structure to things in your composition:

  • Hills and distant mountains have undulating wavy contour lines.
  • Cars these days are not so square looking. They have more flowing contour lines.
  • Rivers, streams, roads and pathways have diminishing S and Z perspective contour lines.
  • Foliage of trees have upper canopy or umbrella shaped contour lines.
  • The growth pattern of tree trunks and the more obvious branches are the skeleton or structural lines of the tree. The flow, direction and angle of these lines clarify the characteristics of the tree.

Note: Not only the shape, but the bones of the object, makes it easy to translate the object onto your canvas.

 For tree example:

If you look at a tree more carefully you will notice that the trunk is leaning, even if it’s only a little, at an angle. And the main obvious branches have a pattern or flow of growth.

And the outer overall shape of the tree’s foliage differs according to its species. Whether it has leaves or not, the overall shape has an outer canopy shape, which can be an umbrella shape, round or oval shape, or as grouped rounded outlines.

Then look at the possible composition and decide where to place the bones of the tree structure. If it’s on the left side, you can have the lean of the tree leaning inwards to direct the eye into the scene. And if on the right-hand side of your canvas, have it pointing inwards, to redirect the eye into the scene or pointing towards the main point of interest.

As to winter trees that have no leaves, you don’t have to put in every twig, if your overall structure and canopy shape describes the type of tree you are trying to convey.

Always remember trees also have branches in the front and at the back. And don’t draw straight neat branches, vary the length and description.

Note:  If everything is neat and tidy, it doesn’t look natural.  Loosen up your strokes to give your drawing and painting a freedom of expression.

For car example:

First consider the size of the car compared with the immediate objects, buildings, trees or people.

Make a synopsis of your vehicle on a piece of paper:

Consider the perspective of the car: Is it directly facing you? Somewhat like a block shape, the back will be small than the front. Or turned three-quarter away from you? The front corner facing you will be bigger perspectively. To get it into perspective, run diminishing lineal lines down its sides and over its top.

  • The body is a ‘rectangle’ shape with smooth flowing lines.
  • The wheels will be partly covered with mudguards.
  • The shape and angles of the windows will depend on the model of the car.

Once you have made the synopsis, cut it out and place it on your painting. Does it fit perspectively and comfortably in your painting? If not, make another one, this time the right size. Repeat if necessary to get the right size.

Note: And of cause the colour of your vehicle is important. If the colour of the object is analogous to its surrounding colours, it will settle comfortably into place.

Conclusion:

If you draw your objects in a simple uncomplicated way, it makes it easier to compose your composition. Without the complexity of finer details, it makes it easier to visualize the enormity of your composition.

If you use light colours draw in your synopsis shapes, you can easily shift their position if necessary, if you are not happy with your first placement decision. The replacement or shift, must of cause be made at the while composing you composition, That is, before you start piling on thick paint, defining the shapes and adding finer details.

Each object that is placed in your composition must sit comfortably with its nearest neighbour. The tangent space or links between objects is important, in their relation to each other. That is, there should be easy flowing lines or transitions between and through them, so that the object of your painting is easily ‘read’.

Now for practice:

Start by looking around you, at the things you’ve always taken for granted.

  • How can you simplify what you are looking at?
  • What are the basic shapes and linear directive lines?
  • What is the basic skeleton structure?
  • Which way do the lines lean? How do they flow?
  • And then consider how to simply the drawing-in of your composition’s format.
  • Where would you put the biggest or boldest shape?

Last word:

If the foundation of your composition is good and strong, the rest of the painting will fall into place and it will be a pleasure painting it.

And you know what I’m going to say?

Great artists weren’t made overnight. The more you practice observing shapes and practice your drawing skills, the more they will improve.

So draw as often as you can, the things you see around you. Make it a game, something fun to do, like doodling while waiting for something to happen.

If you too have a question to ask:

Feel free to put it in the comments block below, or email it to me at: info@adafagan.co.za